Scheme to bring left-behind Afghan refugees to UK will finally launch next month

Hopeful Afghan refugees who left the country in August will begin settling in the UK next month.

Afghanistan’s Interior Ministry announced today, January 2022, five months after the withdrawal of British troops from Kabul.

For Afghans who “support British efforts” or stand for democracy, women’s rights, freedoms and the rule of law will be as important, as are women, girls and minority groups.

British Parliament staff, GardaWorld staff and Chevening experts who could not escape in August will also be screened.

Minister Victoria Atkins will present the details to Parliament in January, with 20,000 people planning to live on the idea live.

British troops helped 15,000 Britons and Afghans flee until August but thousands left behind, at the risk of being killed by the Taliban.

Scroll down to hear the views of the shadow minister

Taliban militants stand guard next to the body of a suicide bomber who was killed while trying to break into a crowded passport office.
Taliban stand guard near the body of a suicide bomber who shot himself while trying to blow himself up in a crowded passport office (Photo: STRINGER / EPA-EFE / REX / Shutterstock)

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Ministers agreed that ACRS would help nearly 5,000 Afghans in its first year – but had restructured it in recent months.

Staff departments last month showed that only 1,171 hopeless refugees from around the world had been relocated to the UK by “settlement” machines since the Covid attack.

A total of 5,371 were transferred in 2017, 5,095 in 2018 and 4,897 in 2019.

The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) today warns 97% of Afghanistan’s population is at risk of falling into poverty by 2022, with 55% – 22.8 million – facing starvation.

Oil prices have risen by 30% since the end of May, hitting a “bad picture” when temperatures dropped to -12C during the Afghan winter, the UN refugee agency said.

The Disaster Management Agency launched the Afghanistan Crisis Commission last week, urging the British people to contribute to relief efforts through dec.org.uk.

Writing in a mirror, Foreign Minister Preet Kaur Gill warned: “Months after the scandal in Kabul, the British airport and our international allies have disappeared from work.”

Preet Kaur Gill warns: “Months after an altercation at Kabul airport, Britain and our international allies have disappeared from the workplace”
Preet Kaur Gill warns: “Months after an altercation at Kabul airport, Britain and our international allies disappear from work” (Photo: Birmingham Live)
He called on the British government to expand access to safe havens for refugees and to ensure that aid reaches Afghanistan.

He added: “Humanitarian aid, while important, is a plastic that is not an alternative to everyday social work.”

Calling on the UK to “discuss new marriage terms with the Taliban”, he added: “Obviously, no stable government will compromise relations with or allow taxes to deal with the Taliban attacks. On rights. women, girls education or terrorism.

“But failure to get a job is expensive and not sustainable.”

A bomb blast near the Kabul passport office has killed at least 40 people and injured dozens more.

“We are committed to supporting all those who have left Afghanistan to achieve their new lives in the UK,” said Victoria Atkins, Afghanistan’s Minister of Return.

“I am very grateful to everyone who has come forward to help.

“The Afghan National Rehabilitation Program provides a safe haven for the weak and vulnerable people from Afghanistan to come to Britain and rebuild their lives.”

“Britain is not working – new rules must be negotiated with Taliban”
From Preet Gill MP, Prime Minister Shadow Shade Minister of International Development

As Afghanistan faces unexpected disasters this cold winter, the international community must urgently provide short-term humanitarian assistance to the Afghan people and negotiate a plan to contribute to a new government. Although months after the violence there was an airport in Kabul in the UK and internationally

First, the UK and its allies must expand access to safe havens for those at risk of fleeing the country and change some governments to accept a fair share of refugees, as an example of love, the British government must open its first to become an Afghan citizen. back in August.

Second, we must ensure that funds reach Afghanistan to provide a budget to enable infrastructure and public services to operate.

We need urgent humanitarian assistance and sustainable development. By the end of October, our government had distributed less than 30 percent of what was promised this year, and three-quarters of last year. This must be improved. We must strengthen our national partners with NGOs and the United Nations to provide emergency assistance to people most in need.

However, humanitarian assistance, while important, is a binding plaster and not an alternative to regular service. The UK must lead its international partners to reform global strategies to raise funds for local authorities to continue to work with doctors and their teachers, hospitals and schools open.

This should include the provision of equipment for the gradual dismantling and distribution, by the United Nations, of local and state assets. After two years of trying to bring peace through security forces and consensus among senior people, we must learn to invest directly in and around Afghanistan.

Third, the government must lead efforts to negotiate new terms with the Taliban. Nearly six months after the fall of Kabul the international community has failed to understand the truth and fail to reflect on our dealings with Afghanistan.

Thus, no stable government can guarantee a relationship with or authorize a taxpayer to kill a Taliban attack on women’s rights, girls’ education or terrorism but failure to do so is entirely of spiritual value. is not sustainable.

That is why weeks of intense international discussion in Doha, at the UN Security Council and in Troika Plus are very important with the opportunity – including tougher terms – to discuss and present the possibility of establishing Afghan government. respect for human rights. Saving millions of lives and preventing famine in Afghanistan – however the political collapse and the ensuing refugee crisis will continue – depends on the success of this resolution.

Yet at a time when Britain is desperately in need of an international table to support hard work, strategic diplomacy, our government is nowhere to be found.

Negotiations in Afghanistan are not through our Prime Minister or our Foreign Secretary, but by ministers and senior government officials from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office have already been hampered by the recent revelations.

As millions of us flock to Christmas receptions, people in Afghanistan do not realize that half the world celebrates.

The country was plunged into crisis after the withdrawal of Western troops in August, as outside aid dried up and the cold snap hit.

The aid agency says more than eight million people are starving and 500,000 children are at risk of malnutrition over the next three months.

Some aid workers have been left on the ground due to security concerns, but Afghanistan’s chief communications officer Sam Mort is also visiting hospitals and clinics to help starving children.

Sam, of Aviemore, Scotland, keeps a diary of what he witnessed in November, writing whenever he could.

Sisters today called on the British people not to forget the crisis that is looming in the country.

Says Sam: “While many people around the world enjoy family and vacation time, the people of Afghanistan, especially women and children, are living in abject poverty.

“As temperatures rise, diseases spread and unemployment rises, families struggle to feed their loved ones and keep them warm.

Children all over the country suffer (Photo: Sayed Habib Bidel)
“UNICEF is active in Afghanistan, in both urban and rural areas, vaccinating infants, caring for malnourished children, and providing water to drought-affected areas. Please help us to help the children who are most in need. ”

Here Sam describes the plight of children in the country.

At 5.45 am I opened the window; the cold snap took my breath away. Winter is here and bad news for the Afghan people who have found themselves in an impending humanitarian crisis.

Today, I flew from Kabul to the western city of Herat for the first time since the Taliban took control on August 15.

I plan to meet with our UNICEF team and visit health clinics to understand the challenges that health workers face as the crisis worsens.

Afghanistan has long been one of the world’s largest donors. As a result, much of the relief has been frozen.

Earlier this year, the Taliban seized control of the country when the United States withdrew its troops. (Photos: AFP via Getty Images)
That means important services for children, such as health and education, are being eroded. Teachers and health workers have spent months without pay.

Unexpected families often marry off their daughters and exchange them for income. People are suffering.

When I arrived in Herat, white Taliban flags lined the street and traders were selling fruit.

Primary school children – including girls – go to school, many have UNICEF-specific bags that always make me laugh.

Since the Taliban took power, girls in grades 7-12 have not been asked to return to public schools or their teachers, but we have been reported to have returned to class for four days.

The weakness of this report is behind it, when we heard at least a week, the schools were closed again.

At the local health center, I was surprised that even though they had not been paid since August, the staff still came to work every day.

The director of the hospital showed me his notes of malnutrition.

As hundreds of thousands of people attend Christmas festivities, people in Afghanistan do not realize that half the world celebrates.

The country was plunged into crisis after the withdrawal of Western troops in August, as outside aid dried up and the cold snap.

The aid agency says more than eight million people are starving and 500,000 children are at risk of starvation in the next three months.

Some aid workers have been left on the ground due to security concerns, but Afghanistan’s communications chief Sam Mort is also visiting hospitals and clinics to help starving children.

Sam, from Aviemore, Scotland, wrote a memoir in November, writing whenever possible.

Sisters today call on the British people not to forget the crisis in the country.

Says Sam: “While many people around the world enjoy family life and leisure time, the people of Afghanistan, especially women and children, live in poverty.

“As temperatures rise, diseases spread and unemployment rises, families struggle to feed their loved ones and keep them warm.

Children all over the country are suffering (Photo: Sayed Habib Bidel)
“UNICEF is working in Afghanistan, in both urban and rural areas, providing immunizations for children, caring for malnourished children, and providing water to drought-affected areas. Please help us to help children they need it the most. ”

Here Sam describes the situation of children in the country.

At 5.45 am I opened the window; the cold of my body took my breath away. Winter is here and bad news for the Afghan people who have found themselves in the coming humanitarian crisis.

Today, I flew from Kabul to the western city of Herat for the first time since the Taliban took control on August 15.

I plan to meet with our UNICEF team and visit health clinics to understand the challenges that health workers face as the crisis worsens.

Afghanistan has long been one of the world’s largest donors. As a result, much of the relief has been frozen.

Earlier this year, the Taliban seized control of the country when the United States withdrew its troops. (Photos: AFP via Getty Images)
This means that vital services for children, such as health and education, are being destroyed. Teachers and health workers have spent months without pay.

Unexpected families often marry off their daughters in exchange for income. People are suffering.

When I arrived in Herat, white Taliban flags were flying outside and merchants were selling fruit.

Primary school children – including girls – go to school, many have UNICEF-specific bags that always make me laugh.

Since the Taliban took power, girls in grades 7-12 have not been asked to return to public schools or their teachers, but we are said to have returned to class for four days.

The weakness of this report is that, after hearing for at least a week, schools are still closed.

At the local health center, I was surprised that even though they had not been paid since August, the staff still went to work every day.

The director of the hospital showed me the details of malnutrition.